SEC Form N-4

AAA

DEFINITION of 'SEC Form N-4'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that must be submitted by all insurance company separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts offering variable annuity contracts. SEC Form N-4 is required under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Investment Company Act of 1940 and is meant to provide investors with information about variable annuity contracts so they can determine whether to invest in them.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form N-4'

Part A of this filing, the prospectus, must contain clearly written information about the investment that the average investor, who may not have a specialized background in finance or law, can understand. Part A contains a general description of the registrant and a general description of variable annuity contracts as well as information about accumulation unit values, deductions, annuity period, death benefit, purchases and contract value, redemptions, taxes and legal proceedings.

Part B provides additional information that is not required to be part of the prospectus but that may be valuable to certain investors, such as general information and history, underwriters and calculation of performance data.

Finally, Part C contains financial statements and exhibits, directors and officers of the depositor, number of contract owners and other required information.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Investment Company Act Of 1940

    Created in 1940 through an act of Congress, this piece of legislation ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with ...
  3. Variable Annuity

    An insurance contract in which, at the end of the accumulation ...
  4. Underwriter

    A company or other entity that administers the public issuance ...
  5. Unit Investment Trust - UIT

    An investment company that offers a fixed, unmanaged portfolio, ...
  6. Accumulation Unit

    1) In the case of a variable annuity, a measurement of the value ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    SEC Filings: Forms You Need To Know

    The forms companies are required to file provide a clear view of their histories and progress.
  2. Professionals

    Get A Job In Compliance

    If you're a stickler for rules, this could be a promising career path for you.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Options & Futures

    Keeping An Eye On The Activities Of Insiders And Institutions

    These transactions reveal much about a stock. We go over what to consider and where to find it.
  5. Personal Finance

    Avoiding Online Investment Scams

    Find out how to spot internet fraud and protect your hard-earned money.
  6. Investing

    Top Cities Where Airbnb Is Legal Or Illegal

    Thinking of subletting your apartment on Airbnb? Make sure that you meet your city's regulations first.
  7. Retirement

    Best Ways to Save For Retirement Without an IRA or 401(k)

    Learn the most common types of savings vehicles used to accumulate money for retirement outside employer-sponsored 401(k)s or IRA accounts.
  8. Term

    Understanding the Maintenance Margin

    A maintenance margin is the minimum amount of equity that must be kept in a margin account.
  9. Credit & Loans

    Co-signing a Loan? Make Sure You Know The Risks

    Contractually, co-signers are just as responsible for the loan as the person actually borrowing the money. Be careful not to put yourself at risk.
  10. Professionals

    How to Buy Annuities When Interest Rates Are Low

    The current low interest rate environment complicates the decision to buy an annuity. Here's what financial advisors need to consider for their clients.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the best ways to sell an annuity?

    The best ways to sell an annuity are to locate buyers from insurance agents or companies that specialize in connecting buyers ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How are non-qualified variable annuities taxed?

    Non-qualified variable annuities are tax-deferred investment vehicles with a unique tax structure. After-tax money is deposited ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can a variable annuity be rolled into an IRA?

    You can roll qualified variable annuities, such as other qualified retirement plan accounts, into a traditional IRA. Non-qualified ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are variable annuities subject to required minimum distribution (RMD)?

    Variable annuities are insurance contracts that provide tax-deferred growth of assets that can later generate a guaranteed ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the disclosure requirements for a private placement?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has set forth disclosure requirements for private placements, including ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What role does the Inspector General play with the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The inspector general of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) oversees, audits and conducts investigations of ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  2. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  3. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  4. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  5. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  6. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!