SEC Form N-PX

AAA

DEFINITION of 'SEC Form N-PX'

A form completed by registered management investment companies and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in order to report its proxy voting record for each twelve-month period, ending on June 30 of each year. The report must be submitted not later than August 31. The SEC makes this information available to the public.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form N-PX'

The filing requirements for Form N-PX are covered under Section 30 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, and Sections 13 and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which require investment companies and trusts to file semiannual and annual reports with the SEC and shareholders.

Individuals should always be able to view a registered investment company's proxy voting record, by either accessing or requesting the information directly from the company or through the SEC's website. Many companies make the information available online under "Investor Relations," or by providing a toll-free number for people wishing to request a copy by mail. By federal law, companies are required to provide their proxy voting records, free of charge, within three days of receiving a request.

RELATED TERMS
  1. SEC Form NT15D2

    A form that is a variant of Form 12b-25, which is a notification ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. Proxy

    1. An agent legally authorized to act on behalf of another party. ...
  4. Securities Act Of 1933

    A federal piece of legislation enacted as a result of the market ...
  5. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
  6. Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis ...

    The electronic filing system created by the Securities and Exchange ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    SEC Filings: Forms You Need To Know

    The forms companies are required to file provide a clear view of their histories and progress.
  2. Investing

    How Your Vote Can Change Corporate Policy

    Shareholders are getting a bigger say in how companies are run. Find out how you can be heard.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Economics

    What Does Vesting Mean?

    Vesting is the process of accruing non-forfeitable rights.
  5. Economics

    What Happened at the Fiscal Cliff?

    The fiscal cliff refers to a scenario on December 31, 2012, in which the Bush-era tax cuts were set to expire.
  6. Economics

    What's a Conglomerate?

    A conglomerate is a corporation that’s comprised of several different independent businesses.
  7. Investing Basics

    Breaking Down Optimal Capital Structure

    An optimal capital structure shows the best balance of debt to equity a company can have in order to minimize its cost of capital.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Free Trade

    Free trade exists when nations can swap goods and services without the constraints of tariffs, duties or quotas.
  9. Economics

    Explaining the CAMELS Rating System

    Regulators use the CAMELS rating system to evaluate a bank’s level of risk and overall condition.
  10. Term

    What is a Preemptive Right?

    A preemptive right allows select shareholders to buy newly issued shares in their corporation before the general public.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Where are the Social Security administration headquarters?

    The U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is headquartered in Woodlawn, Maryland, a suburb just outside of Baltimore. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the Social Security administration responsible for?

    The main responsibility of the U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is overseeing the country's Social Security program. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is the Social Security administration a government corporation?

    The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) is a government agency, not a government corporation. President Franklin Roosevelt ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the disclosure requirements for a private placement?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has set forth disclosure requirements for private placements, including ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What role does the Inspector General play with the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The inspector general of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) oversees, audits and conducts investigations of ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  3. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  4. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  5. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  6. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!