SEC MEF Filings



SEC filings that concern registration of up to an additional 20% of securities for an offering, pursuant to the 1933 Securities Act Rule 462(b). SEC MEF Filings may apply to 1933 Act registration forms S-1, S-2, S-3, S-11, SB-1, SB-2, F-1, F-2 and F-3.


Rule 462(b) says that a registration statement and any post-effective amendments for up to an additional 20% of securities will become effective upon filing with the SEC if the registration is for the same class of securities already approved for registration by the SEC.

  1. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  2. Registration

    1. The process by which a company files required documents with ...
  3. Follow-On Offering

    An issue of shares of stock that comes after a company has already ...
  4. Subsequent Offering

    An offering of additional shares after the issuing company has ...
  5. Securities Act Of 1933

    A federal piece of legislation enacted as a result of the market ...
  6. Securities Exchange Act Of 1934

    The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 was created to provide governance ...
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