Securities And Exchange Commission - SEC

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DEFINITION of 'Securities And Exchange Commission - SEC'

A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities markets and protect investors. In addition to regulation and protection, it also monitors the corporate takeovers in the U.S. The SEC is composed of five commissioners appointed by the U.S. President and approved by the Senate. The statutes administered by the SEC are designed to promote full public disclosure and to protect the investing public against fraudulent and manipulative practices in the securities markets. Generally, most issues of securities offered in interstate commerce, through the mail or on the internet must be registered with the SEC.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Securities And Exchange Commission - SEC'

Here's an example of an activity that falls within the SEC's domain: if someone purchases more than 5% of a company's equity, he or she must report to the SEC within 10 days of the purchase because of the takeover threats it may cause.

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