Second Lien Debt

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Second Lien Debt'

Debts that are subordinate to the rights of other, more senior debts issued against the same collateral, or a portion of the same collateral. If a borrower defaults, second lien debts stand behind higher lien debts in terms of rights to collect proceeds from the debt's underlying collateral.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Second Lien Debt'

When lenders issue loans to borrowers, they commonly require that collateral be made against the principal of the loan to ensure that the principal can be repaid in the future.

In the case of a real estate mortgage, the lender effectively places a lien on the asset so that if it is sold, the lender will be first in line to receive funds. If a second mortgage is taken out on the same property, the second loan will be considered second lien debt to the first mortgage, and will be subordinate to the first in terms of return of principal. For this reason, second lien debt is usually considered riskier than higher lien debt and often comes with a higher interest rate as a result.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  2. Inchoate

    A state of activity or entitlement that is characterized by partial ...
  3. Non-Possessory Lien

    The legal claim against an asset in order to secure payment of ...
  4. Lien

    The legal right of a creditor to sell the collateral property ...
  5. Creditor

    An entity (person or institution) that extends credit by giving ...
  6. Collateral

    Property or other assets that a borrower offers a lender to secure ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Profit From Mortgage Debt With MBS

    Mortgage-backed securities can offer monthly income, a fixed interest rate and even government backing.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  3. Options & Futures

    Top 7 Most Common Financial Mistakes

    Choose fortune over disaster by avoiding these money traps.
  4. Investing

    Reassessing Your Approach To Bond Investing

    Rethinking your fixed-income portfolio may not resonate in quite the same way as dropping 10 pounds or finally giving up that smoking habit.
  5. Credit & Loans

    Are APRs different in different countries?

    Learn about the term APR and how it is used in the United States and other countries. Explore why different lenders charge different APRs.
  6. Credit & Loans

    What loans do and don't have an APR?

    Learn about what annual percentage rates (APR) are and what they mean. Explore different fixed and variable APRs charge by different lenders.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How much of my total assets should I be keeping in my money market account?

    Investing a portion of total assets in a cash position such as a money market account provides investors access to funds in the case of an emergency.
  8. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How does preferred stock differ from company issued bonds?

    Discover the primary differences between preferred stock and corporate bonds, two income-generating investment vehicles issued by certain companies.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What is the difference between yield to maturity and the yield to call?

    Determining various the various yields that callable bonds can provide investors is an important factor in the bond purchasing process.
  10. Credit & Loans

    What are the pros and cons of owning an equity REIT versus a mortgage REIT?

    Learn about investing in equity, mortgage and hybrid REITs. Explore the different strategies REITs employ to generate income and create dividends.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  2. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  3. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  4. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  5. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  6. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
Trading Center