Section 1041

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DEFINITION of 'Section 1041'

A section of the Internal Revenue Code that mandates that any transfer of property from one spouse to another is income tax-free. No deductible loss or taxable gain can be declared. This section applies to transfers during marriage as well as in the divorce process. Section 1041 was enacted in order to simplify the consolidation of marital assets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Section 1041'

Section 1041 does not apply to transfers to nonresident-alien spouses, certain transfers of mortgaged property between trusts or transfers of U.S. savings bonds. This section also places the tax burden on the recipient of any transfer of marital property incident to a divorce (the property is treated as a gift); therefore, it can be in the interest of a divorcing spouse to negotiate for assets that have minimal taxable appreciation.

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