Section 16


DEFINITION of 'Section 16'

A section of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 that is used to describe the various regulatory filing responsibilities that must be met by directors, officers and principal stockholders. According to Section 16, every person who is directly or indirectly the beneficial owner of more than 10% of the company, or who is a director or an officer of the issuer of such a security, shall file the statements required by this subsection with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

BREAKING DOWN 'Section 16'

Insiders affiliated with a public company, or any owners of more than 10%, are required to electronically file Form 3 with the SEC no later than 10 days after the individual becomes affiliated with the company. If there is a material change in the holdings of the company's insiders, they are required to file Form 4 with the SEC. Also, pursuant to Section 16, Form 5 must be filed by an insider who has conducted an insider transaction during the year if it was not previously reported on Form 4.

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