Section 1245

What is 'Section 1245'

Section 1245 is a part of the IRS code stating that depreciable property that has been sold at a price in excess of depreciated or salvage value may qualify for favorable capital-gains tax treatment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Section 1245'

This is generally a good thing for the seller. Generally capital gains taxation rates are more favorable than income tax, and under section 1245 they are even a little more advantageous.

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