Sector Analysis

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DEFINITION of 'Sector Analysis'

A review and assessment of the current condition and future prospects of a given sector of the economy. Sector analysis serves to provide an investor with an idea of how well a given group of companies are expected to perform as a whole.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sector Analysis'

Sector analysis is typically employed by investors who are practicing a sector-rotation strategy, or by those who are using a top-down approach to selecting stock to invest in. In the top-down approach to investing, the most promising sectors are identified first, and then the investor reviews the companies within that sector to determine which individual stocks will ultimately be purchased.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does seasonality affect the forest products sector?

    The concept of seasonality comes from the analysis of time series data. A certain data set demonstrates characteristics that ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between an industry and a sector?

    The terms industry and sector are often used interchangeably to describe a group of companies that operate in the same segment ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between "top-down" and "bottom-up" investing?

    Before we look at the differences between top-down and bottom-up investing, we should make it clear that both of these approaches ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Under what circumstances would someone enter into a repurchase agreement?

    In finance, a repurchase agreement represents a contract between two parties, where one party sells a security to the other ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Is there a way to include intangible assets in book-to-market ratio calculations?

    The book-to-market ratio is used in fundamental analysis to identify whether a company's securities are overvalued or undervalued. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What types of corporations would be expected to have higher growth rates than more ...

    Investors looking for corporations with higher-than-average growth rates have several factors to consider. Although younger ... Read Full Answer >>
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