Sectoral Currency

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DEFINITION

A medium of exchange that only has value in a limited marketplace. Sectoral currencies are a type of complementary currency. The other major type of complementary currency is a regional or local currency, which only has value in specified locations within a limited geographic region.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The Fureai Kippu is a well-known type of sectoral currency. These "caring relationship tickets" support a time-dollar system used in Japan to provide health care to the elderly and the disabled. Individuals earn the currency by spending their time providing care to someone in need. The hours of service they accumulate can be used to pay for their own care in the future or for the care of a family member with a present need.


Other examples of sectoral currencies include loyalty program rewards and gift cards. Regional currency examples include BerkShares, Toronto dollars and Lewes pounds.




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