Secure Option ARM


DEFINITION of 'Secure Option ARM'

A type of payment-option adjustible-rate mortgage with a fixed-interest-rate period. The mechanics of a secure option arm are very similar to a payment option arm except that it has a fixed interest rate period similar to fixed period or hybrid ARM. In other words, secure option ARMs have the same monthly payment options as a payment option ARM, including a minimum payment option that is based on a temporary start interest rate that lasts for first one to three months. However, after the expiration of the temporary start interest rate, the secure option ARM has a fixed-interest-rate period similar to a fixed-period or hybrid ARM.


While secure option arms offer more protection from payment shock than a true payment option arm, the monthly payment on a secure option arm still has the potential to increase substantially. This can occur if the negative amortization limit is reached or when the fixed-interest-rate period ends, which usually coincides with the first scheduled recast of the mortgage.

  1. Payment Shock

    The risk that a loan's scheduled future periodic payments may ...
  2. Payment Option ARM

    A monthly adjusting adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) which allows ...
  3. Deferred Interest

    The amount of interest that is added to the principal balance ...
  4. Negative Amortization

    An increase in the principal balance of a loan caused by making ...
  5. Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ARM

    A type of mortgage in which the interest rate paid on the outstanding ...
  6. Put-Call Parity

    A principle that defines the relationship between the price of ...
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    ARMed And Dangerous

    In a climate of rising interest rates, having an adjustable-rate mortgage can be risky.
  2. Home & Auto

    Option ARMs: American Dream Or Mortgage Nightmare?

    Option adjustable rate mortgages could make or break your home-buying experience.
  3. Investing Basics

    What Does Plain Vanilla Mean?

    Plain vanilla is a term used in investing to describe the most basic types of financial instruments.
  4. Insurance

    What is a Force Majeure?

    A force majeure clause frees both parties in a contract from fulfilling their obligations in the event of some catastrophic or unexpected occurrence.
  5. Credit & Loans

    Explaining Equated Monthly Installments

    An equated monthly installment is a fixed payment a borrower makes to a lender on the same date of each month.
  6. Options & Futures

    Pick 401(k) Assets Like A Pro

    Professionals choose the options available to you in your plan, making your decisions easier.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Use Options Data To Predict Stock Market Direction

    Options market trading data can provide important insights about the direction of stocks and the overall market. Here’s how to track it.
  8. Investing Basics

    Tiny House Movement: Making Market Opportunities

    The tiny house movement throws all assumptions about household budgeting and mortgage management out the window, and creates new market segments too.
  9. Investing

    Where Should I Keep My Down Payment Savings?

    While saving up for a down payment, where should you keep your money. A bank? The stock market? It all depends on your timeline.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Questions To Ask Your Mortgage Lender

    When buying a house, avoid nasty surprises by asking the right questions about your mortgage lender's qualifications and the mortgage process.
  1. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between derivatives and options?

    Options are one category of derivatives. Other types of derivatives include futures contracts, swaps and forward contracts. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are rights distributed in a rights offering?

    In a rights offering, rights are distributed to shareholders based on the number of shares they already own. What Is a Rights ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  2. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  3. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  5. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  6. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!