Securities And Futures Commission - SFC

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DEFINITION of 'Securities And Futures Commission - SFC '

An independent, non-governmental statutory body responsible for regulating Hong Kong's securities and futures markets. The Securities and Futures Commission (SFC) was established by the Securities and Futures Commission Ordinance (SFCO). The SFC administers the laws governing Hong Kong's securities and futures markets, and facilitates the development of these markets. The SFC's statutory objectives are to:

  1. Maintain and promote fairness, efficiency, competitiveness and transparency in the securities and futures markets
  2. Promote public understanding
  3. Protect investors
  4. Reduce crime and misconduct
  5. Reduce risks Assist the Financial Secretary in maintaining Hong Kong's financial stability

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Securities And Futures Commission - SFC '

Hong Kong's Securities and Futures Commission's operational units include corporate finance, policy, China and investment products, enforcement, supervision of markets, licensing and intermediaries supervision. Each of the SFC's operational units is supported by the legal services department and corporate affairs division. The SFC regulates licensed corporations and individuals that perform regulated activities including:


  1. Dealing in securities or futures contracts
  2. Leveraged foreign exchange trading
  3. Advising on securities, futures contracts or corporate finance
  4. Providing automated trading services or credit rating services
  5. Securities margin financing
  6. Asset management
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