Segregated Disclosures


DEFINITION of 'Segregated Disclosures'

A series of lender declarations that are required by law to be grouped separately from other documents in a vehicle lease. Segregated disclosures are required by Regulation M, issued by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Board. Regulation M is intended to apply the consumer leasing provisions included in the Truth in Lending Act (Title I, Consumer Credit Protection Act).

BREAKING DOWN 'Segregated Disclosures'

The segregated disclosures and other documents make up the vehicle lease, and must be reviewed before signing the lease agreement. Included in the segregated disclosures section of an automobile lease are the date, lessor(s), lessee(s), amount due at lease signing or delivery, monthly payment details, excessive wear and use fees, purchase option terms and other important terms.

  1. Truth In Lending Act - TILA

    A federal law enacted in 1968 with the intention of protecting ...
  2. Security Deposit

    A monetary deposit given to a lender, seller or landlord as proof ...
  3. Lessor

    The owner of an asset that is leased under an agreement to the ...
  4. Disclosure

    The act of releasing all relevant information pertaining to a ...
  5. Lessee

    The person who rents land or property from a lessor. The lessee ...
  6. Equal Credit Opportunity Act - ...

    A regulation created by the U.S. government that states that ...
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