Segregated Disclosures

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DEFINITION of 'Segregated Disclosures'

A series of lender declarations that are required by law to be grouped separately from other documents in a vehicle lease. Segregated disclosures are required by Regulation M, issued by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Board. Regulation M is intended to apply the consumer leasing provisions included in the Truth in Lending Act (Title I, Consumer Credit Protection Act).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Segregated Disclosures'

The segregated disclosures and other documents make up the vehicle lease, and must be reviewed before signing the lease agreement. Included in the segregated disclosures section of an automobile lease are the date, lessor(s), lessee(s), amount due at lease signing or delivery, monthly payment details, excessive wear and use fees, purchase option terms and other important terms.

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