Select Mortality Table

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DEFINITION of 'Select Mortality Table'

A mortality table which outlines life contingency statistics for a certain period of time. A select mortality table includes mortality data on individuals who have recently purchased life insurance. These individuals tend to have lower mortality rates than individuals who are already insured, due chiefly to the fact that they have most likely just passed certain medical exams required to obtain insurance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Select Mortality Table'

Insurance companies use mortality tables in order to determine proper premiums and fees that must be charged to individuals seeking insurance in order to be profitable. Select, ultimate and aggregate mortality tables can all be used by insurance companies in order calculate the risks associated with individuals seeking insurance.

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