Self-Liquidating Loan

DEFINITION of 'Self-Liquidating Loan'

A type of short- or intermediate-term credit that is repaid with money generated by the assets it is used to purchase. The repayment schedule and maturity of a self-liquidating loan are designed to coincide with the timing of the assets' income generation. These loans are intended to finance purchases that will quickly and reliably generate cash.

BREAKING DOWN 'Self-Liquidating Loan'

A business might use a self-liquidating loan to purchase extra inventory in anticipation of the holiday shopping season. The revenue generated from selling that inventory would be used to repay the loan. Self-liquidating loans are not always a good credit choice. For example, they do not make sense for fixed assets, such as real estate, or depreciable assets, such as machinery.
There are also a number of scams that call themselves "self-liquidating loans".

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