Sell-Out

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DEFINITION of 'Sell-Out'

When a broker or investor buying stocks has failed to settle the trade in a timely manner and, as a result, the broker can forcibly sell the securities on the investor's behalf.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sell-Out'

A perfect example of this is when the broker sells a person's stock to meet a margin call.

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