Semiannual

What does 'Semiannual' mean

A semiannual event happens twice a year, typically every six months. Semiannual is an adjective that can describe something that occurs, or is payable, reported or published twice each year, as in a semiannual periodical.


For example, most bonds pay interest semiannually until maturity, meaning bond holders will receive two interest payments each year.

BREAKING DOWN 'Semiannual'

If a corporation pays a semiannual dividend, its shareholders will receive dividends twice yearly (a corporation can choose how many dividends to distribute each year - if any). Financial statements or reports are frequently published on a quarterly (four times per year) or semiannual basis.

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