Semi-Strong Form Efficiency

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DEFINITION of 'Semi-Strong Form Efficiency'

A class of EMH (Efficient Market Hypothesis) that implies all public information is calculated into a stock's current share price. Meaning that neither fundamental nor technical analysis can be used to achieve superior gains.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Semi-Strong Form Efficiency'

This class of EMH suggests that only information that is not publicly available can benefit investors seeking to earn abnormal returns on investments. All other information is accounted for in the stocks price and, regardless of the amount of fundamental and technical analysis one performs, above normal returns will not be had.

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