Senate Bill

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DEFINITION of 'Senate Bill'

A piece of proposed legislation that either originated or was modified in the United States Senate. In order to become law, a senate bill must win majority approval in both the Senate and the House of Representatives and then be approved by the President of the United States.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Senate Bill'

After a senate bill has been drafted and introduced in the Senate Chamber, it is entered in the Senate Journal, given a number, printed and delivered to an appropriate committee for debate. Any amendments to the bill during the process must, likewise, be voted on.

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