Single Euro Payment Area - SEPA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Single Euro Payment Area - SEPA '

A system that is designed to create financial efficiency for countries using the euro by providing a unified system in which to perform financial transactions. The SEPA seeks to create a better system for credit transfers, an improved debit system and a cheaper way for individuals and firms to make transactions within member countries or regions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Single Euro Payment Area - SEPA '

The European Commission wants the European market to be self sufficient by the year 2010, but banks will begin to implement SEPA in 2008. Up to 29 countries are slated to become a part of SEPA; the goal is to make a unified system in which financial transactions can be performed with reduced transaction costs and greater efficiency.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Euro

    The official currency of the European Union's (EU) member states. ...
  2. Eurozone

    A geographic and economic region that consists of all the European ...
  3. European Monetary System - EMS

    A 1979 arrangement between several European countries which links ...
  4. European Economic and Monetary ...

    The successor to the European Monetary System (EMS), the combination ...
  5. European Union - EU

    A group of European countries that participates in the world ...
  6. ISP (Internet Service Provider)

    A company that provides consumers, businesses, and other Internet ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Go International With Foreign Index Funds

    As global trade continues to expand and the world's economies grow, spice up your portfolio with these exciting opportunities.
  2. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  3. Forex Education

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  4. Personal Finance

    What Are Central Banks?

    They print money, they control inflation, and much, much more. All you need to know about central banks is here.
  5. Forex

    How do central banks acquire currency reserves and how much are they required to hold?

    A currency reserve is a currency that is held in large amounts by governments and other institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. Reserve currencies usually also become the international ...
  6. Chart Advisor

    Use This ETF To Trade The Swiss Franc

    Traders were stunned last week when the Swiss National Bank removed the currency peg that tied the value of the Swiss franc to the euro.
  7. Economics

    Sanctions & Falling Oil Prices Hit Ruble Hard

    Russia, through its aggressive actions, has brought upon itself sanctions which, coupled with falling oil prices, have adversely impacted its economy.
  8. Economics

    What is the difference between a nation's current account deficit and its currency valuation?

    Learn the respective meanings of the two terms, current account deficit and currency valuation, and understand the relationship between them.
  9. Forex Strategies

    How do I use the Haurlan Index to create a forex trading strategy?

    See how the three components of the Haurlan index can be used by forex traders to assess the strength of buyers and sellers for a currency pair.
  10. Forex

    Bitcoin's Main Stumbling Block: Navigating The Law

    Coders created Bitcoin to be decentralized and independent of governments and banks. Authorities are still struggling to create a legal framework.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  2. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  3. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  4. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  5. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  6. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
Trading Center