Series B Financing

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DEFINITION of 'Series B Financing'

The second round of financing for a business by private equity investors or venture capitalists. Successive rounds of financing or funding a business are termed Series A, Series B (and so on) financing. The Series B round will generally take place when the company has accomplished certain milestones in developing its business.




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Series B Financing'

Because the company will generally have advanced its business by the time of the B-round financing, it will typically have a higher valuation by this time. This means that the Series B investor will usually pay a higher price for investing in the company than the Series A investor. Private equity investors prefer convertible preferred stock to common stock for the various financing rounds because of the special features of preferred stock, such as dividend accrual and anti-dilution, that may not be available in common stock.

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