Series 6

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Series 6'

A securities license entitling the holder to register as a limited representative and sell mutual funds, variable annuities and insurance premiums. Holders of the Series 6 license are not permitted to sell corporate or municipal securities, direct participation programs and options.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Series 6'

In order to obtain the Series 6 license, candidates must pass the Investment Company/Variable Contracts Products Limited Representative (Series 6) exam. The Series 6 exam is administered by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) (formerly the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD)), and covers topics on mutual funds, variable annuities, securities and tax regulations, retirement plans and insurance products. A passing grade is achieved by correctly answering at least 70 of 100 questions correctly within two hours and 15 minutes.

Candidates must be sponsored by a member of FINRA or a self-regulatory organization (SRO) in order to write the exam. Upon receiving a passing grade, candidates must then register with FINRA through their sponsoring firms in order to transact authorized securities.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Series 55

    A securities license entitling the holder to actively participate ...
  2. Series 63

    A securities license entitling the holder to solicit orders for ...
  3. Series 65

    A securities license required by most U.S. states for individuals ...
  4. Series 4

    A securities license entitling the holder to supervise options ...
  5. Series 31

    A securities license entitling the holder to sell managed futures ...
  6. Series 30

    A securities license entitling the holder to become a futures ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the differences between the Series 6 exam and the Series 7 exam?

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) offers a variety of licenses that must be obtained before conducting ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does it mean to be long or short a derivative?

    A derivative is a type of security in which the price of the security is dependent on one or more underlying assets. A derivative ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I calculate the tracking error of an ETF or indexed mutual fund?

    Calculate the tracking error of an indexed exchange-trade fund (ETF) or mutual fund by doing a standard deviation percentage ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is an over-the-counter derivative?

    A derivative is a type of security in which the price of the security depends on the price of the underlying asset. Depending ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do you calculate the excess return of an ETF or indexed mutual fund?

    For exchange-traded funds (ETFs), the excess return should be equal to the risk-adjusted (or beta) measure that exceeds the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does the underlying of a derivative refer to?

    A derivative security is a financial instrument in which the price of the derivative is dependent on its underlying asset. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    6 Proven Tips For Series 6 Success

    These techniques can help you pass this test without the added stress.
  2. Insurance

    Tips For Passing The Series 6 Exam

    Find out what you can do during the test to make sure you get a passing score.
  3. Professionals

    Breaking Down Financial Securities Licenses

    Find out which exam you need to begin your career as an investment professional.
  4. Professionals

    Should You Add A Securities License To Your Qualifications?

    Clients love planners who sell securities, but a securities license takes a lot of work. Learn if the stress and study are worth it.
  5. Professionals

    Why Bad Credit Is Bad For Financial Careers

    In order to obtain and maintain a career in the financial industry, it is also important to have a clean credit report.
  6. Professionals

    Keeping Up With Your Continuing Education

    Professional maintenance can be a chore. Learn how to streamline the process.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Mutual Funds or ETFs: Which is Better?

    Trying to decide between a mutual fund or ETF? Here's what you need to know.
  8. Investing Basics

    Understanding Open-End Funds

    An open-end fund is a type of mutual fund that does not limit the amount of shares it issues, but issues as many shares as investors are willing to buy.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Why You May Want To Be (And Stay) In Bonds

    Bonds are complicated, and it’s easy to feel intimidated or confused. Fortunately, you don’t need to be a numbers geek to be an informed investor.
  10. Professionals

    5 Signs That You Have a Lousy 401(k) Plan

    Knowing whether a 401(k) plan is good or not so good is important. This will help participants decide how much to invest and when to demand improvements.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Mixed Economic System

    An economic system that features characteristics of both capitalism and socialism.
  2. Net Worth

    The amount by which assets exceed liabilities. Net worth is a concept applicable to individuals and businesses as a key measure ...
  3. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  4. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  5. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  6. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
Trading Center