Settling-In Allowance

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DEFINITION of 'Settling-In Allowance'

Money given to a person who has relocated for work to help them meet their immediate financial obligations upon moving. The settling-in allowance may be given as a lump sum or may be reimbursed upon submission of related receipts. A settling-in allowance might be used for expenses such as temporary lodging, meals, storage of personal belongings and other incidental costs of settling in at a new location.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Settling-In Allowance'

Companies may assist employees who have to move for work, whether because of a transfer or a new job offer, in many ways. In addition to a settling-in allowance, they might award a relocation allowance or direct reimbursement for relocation expenses. Relocation expenses often include transportation, accommodation and meals for house hunting trips, temporary lodging upon arrival in the new location, moving company and storage costs, and costs associated with selling and acquiring a primary residence, such as real estate commissions and other closing costs. For temporary relocation, a company might provide both a settling-in allowance and a living allowance.

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