Setup Price

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DEFINITION of 'Setup Price'

A price level predetermined as the point of entry into a specific security, stock, or currency. Once the setup price is broken the trader will enter the position determined by the setup. This could include shorting a stock because they think the price will drop or going long because they expect an upward movement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Setup Price'

The setup price can be determined based on technical or fundamental factors as well as personal opinion on the part of the trader. Usually reaching the setup price is not enough to make a move. Generally traders wait for a significant break to confirm the trend will continue.

For example, if you're looking for the price of a stock to go above $25 before buying, the setup price is $25. It might be better for the price to exceed $25.05 instead of purchasing as soon as $25 is reached. Timing will depend on volume, volatility and many other factors affecting price movements.

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