Special Economic Zone - SEZ

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DEFINITION of 'Special Economic Zone - SEZ'

Designated areas in countries that possess special economic regulations that are different from other areas in the same country. Moreover, these regulations tend to contain measures that are conducive to foreign direct investment. Conducting business in a SEZ usually means that a company will receive tax incentives and the opportunity to pay lower tariffs.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Special Economic Zone - SEZ'

While many countries have set up special economic zones, China has been the most successful in using SEZ to attract foreign capital. In fact, China has even declared an entire province (Hainan) to be an SEZ, which is quite distinct, as most SEZs are cities.

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