Shareholder Register

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Shareholder Register'

A list of active owners of a company's shares, updated on an ongoing basis. The shareholder register requires that every current shareholder be recorded. The register includes each person's name, address and number of shares held, but can further detail the holder's occupation and price paid. The shareholder register is fundamental to the examination of the ownership of a company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shareholder Register'

The shareholder register differs from a shareholders list in that the shareholders list is updated only once per year, whereas the register keeps track of the current partial owners of a company.

Access to the register is usually available between 9 a.m. and 5 a.m. every business day, free for current shareholders and may require a small fee for non-shareholders. This will allow communication to, and between, shareholders of information such as the price per share in a takeover bid.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Shareholder

    Any person, company or other institution that owns at least one ...
  2. Clearing House Electronic Subregister ...

    A computer system operated by the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) ...
  3. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  4. Registered Bond

    A bond whose owner is registered with the bond's issuer. The ...
  5. Registered Security

    1. The name given to securities whereby ownership is registered ...
  6. Shares

    A unit of ownership interest in a corporation or financial asset. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a merger and a takeover?

    In a general sense, mergers and takeovers (or acquisitions) are very similar corporate actions - they combine two previously ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does additional equity financing affect existing shareholders?

    Additional equity financing dilutes existing shareholders. There are two types of candidates for equity financing. One is ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do the C-suite members work together to make a successful company?

    Corporate managers, typically chosen by a board of directors in large organizations, are ultimately responsible to stakeholders ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What rights do all common shareholders have?

    Individuals that own common shares of company stock are viewed as the true owners of that company. As such, a common shareholder ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why is a shareholder rights plan called a "poison pill?"

    To avoid being the target of a hostile takeover by a larger firm, a corporate board might adopt a defensive strategy called ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can investors influence the c-suite?

    Investors in publicly traded firms can influence C-suite executives by exercising voting rights or engaging in investor activism. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Interpreting A Company's IPO Prospectus Report

    Learn to decipher the secret language of the IPO prospectus report - it can tell you a lot about a company's future.
  2. Investing Basics

    Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder

    We delve into common stock owners' privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
  3. Options & Futures

    Keeping An Eye On The Activities Of Insiders And Institutions

    These transactions reveal much about a stock. We go over what to consider and where to find it.
  4. Investing

    Digging In To 13D Disclosures

    This document can provide important clues about a company and its stock.
  5. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  6. Investing Basics

    What are Ordinary Shares?

    Ordinary shares are any type of shares that are not preferred and don’t pay any type of predetermined dividend amount.
  7. Investing News

    A New Corporate Governance Initiative In Japan

    Expectations are low that Japan can create a corporate governance climate that meets global standards, but a new initiative is aimed at doing just that.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Rights Offering

    A rights offering is an offer by a company to its existing shareholders of the right to buy additional shares in proportion to the number they already own.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is a Record Date?

    The date established by an issuer of a security for the purpose of determining the holders who are entitled to receive a dividend or distribution.
  10. Investing Basics

    What is a Share?

    A share – also called a stock -- is a unit of ownership in a corporation or financial asset.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Geometric Mean

    The average of a set of products, the calculation of which is commonly used to determine the performance results of an investment ...
  2. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  3. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  4. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  5. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  6. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
Trading Center