Shareholder Register

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DEFINITION of 'Shareholder Register'

A list of active owners of a company's shares, updated on an ongoing basis. The shareholder register requires that every current shareholder be recorded. The register includes each person's name, address and number of shares held, but can further detail the holder's occupation and price paid. The shareholder register is fundamental to the examination of the ownership of a company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shareholder Register'

The shareholder register differs from a shareholders list in that the shareholders list is updated only once per year, whereas the register keeps track of the current partial owners of a company.

Access to the register is usually available between 9 a.m. and 5 a.m. every business day, free for current shareholders and may require a small fee for non-shareholders. This will allow communication to, and between, shareholders of information such as the price per share in a takeover bid.

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