Shareholder Value

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DEFINITION of 'Shareholder Value'

The value delivered to shareholders because of management's ability to grow earnings, dividends and share price. In other words, shareholder value is the sum of all strategic decisions that affect the firm's ability to efficiently increase the amount of free cash flow over time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shareholder Value'

Making wise investments and generating a healthy return on invested capital are two main drivers of shareholder value. It is no wonder why there is a fine line between responsibly growing shareholder value and doing whatever is needed to generate a profit. Reckless decisions and aggressively chasing profit at the expense of the environment or others can easily cause shareholder value to decline.

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