Shareholder Services Agent

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DEFINITION of 'Shareholder Services Agent'

A financial institution or similar entity responsible for looking after the needs of the shareholders of publicly-traded corporations or mutual funds. Shareholder services agents typically look after investor record-keeping and communication and other administrative responsibilities, and they attend to shareholders' problems or concerns.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shareholder Services Agent'

Once a private company grows to a sufficient size and decides to go public, it must adhere to government regulations regarding information disclosure and shareholder rights. Many public companies and mutual funds seek the expertise of a shareholder services agent to ensure their shareholders' needs are looked after efficiently. Even if shareholder services are conducted in-house via an agent, they represent one of the extra costs associated with a publicly-traded company as opposed to a private one.

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