Shareholder Value Transfer - SVT

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DEFINITION of 'Shareholder Value Transfer - SVT'

A metric intended to guide shareholders in how much equity compensation should be awarded for employees and executives of publicly traded companies. Shareholder Value Transfer is calculated as the total value of equity grants divided by the market capitalization of the company. This yields a percentage to which existing shareholders would be diluted under a given equity compensation plan.

BREAKING DOWN 'Shareholder Value Transfer - SVT'

The Shareholder Value Transfer metric was created by Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS), a research firm that advises shareholders on how to vote on shareholder proposals. ISS calculates shareholder value transfer for the top companies within each industry and decides on a maximum "cap" amount that any company should have to pay in shareholder value transfer, in order to perform well. ISS then typically advises investors to vote against any equity compensation proposal that would exceed the shareholder value transfer cap.

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