Share Turnover

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DEFINITION of 'Share Turnover'

A measure of stock liquidity calculated by dividing the total number of shares traded over a period by the average number of shares outstanding for the period. The higher the share turnover, the more liquid the share of the company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Share Turnover'

For example, if the total amount of shares traded over the year was 10 billion and the average amount of shares outstanding for the year was 100 million, the share turnover for the year is 100 times.

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