Shark Watcher

DEFINITION of 'Shark Watcher'

A firm specializing in the early detection of takeovers. The firm's primary business is usually the solicitation of proxies for client corporations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Shark Watcher'

A shark watcher monitors trading patterns in a client's stock and attempts to determine who is accumulating shares.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Lobster Trap

    A strategy used by a target firm to prevent a hostile takeover. ...
  2. People Pill

    A defensive strategy to ward off a hostile takeover. The target ...
  3. Macaroni Defense

    An approach taken by a company that does not want to be taken ...
  4. Pac-Man

    A high-risk hostile takeover defense in which the target firm ...
  5. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
  6. Poison Pill

    A strategy used by corporations to discourage hostile takeovers. ...
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Finding Success Where Indicators Fail

    Trade what you see: Follow the charts, buy breakouts and honor stops. We'll look at a case study to show you how.
  2. Options & Futures

    Reverse Mergers: The Pros And Cons

    Reverse mergers can provide excellent opportunities for companies and investors, but there are still some downsides and risks.
  3. Options & Futures

    Pinpoint Takeovers First

    Use these seven steps to discover a takeover before the rest of the market catches on.
  4. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Trade Takeover Stocks With Merger Arbitrage

    This high-risk strategy attempts to profit from price discrepancies that arise during acquisitions.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Trademarks Of A Takeover Target

    These tips can lead you to little companies with big prospects.
  6. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  7. Economics

    Understanding the American Dream

    The American dream is the belief that anyone, regardless of where they’re born or into what class, can attain their own version of success.
  8. Stock Analysis

    Dow Chemical: An Activist Investment Analysis (DOW)

    Read about how an activist hedge fund demanded changes at Dow Chemical. Learn about deal structure of the proposed merger between Dow and DuPont.
  9. Term

    What's a Vertical Merger?

    A vertical merger occurs when two companies that produce goods or services for the same finished product merge operations.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    4 Reasons Small Cap Companies Are Actively Engaged in M&As

    Read about the reasons why smaller-cap companies actively take part in mergers and acquisitions (M&As). In addition to new synergies, they also access new markets.
RELATED FAQS
  1. When is a takeover bid legally canceled?

    When a firm makes an official bid to take over a target company, a legal offer is created. The firm making the offer becomes ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a merger and a takeover?

    In a general sense, mergers and takeovers (or acquisitions) are very similar corporate actions - they combine two previously ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens to the shares of stock purchased in a tender offer?

    The shares of stock purchased in a tender offer become the property of the purchaser. From that point forward, the purchaser, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some common accretive transactions?

    The term "accretive" is most often used in reference to mergers and acquisitions (M&A). It refers to a transaction that ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are companies with high Book Value Of Equity Per Share (BVPS) takeover targets?

    Companies with high book value of equity per share (BVPS) can be good takeover targets if those companies are public and ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  2. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  3. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  4. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  5. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  6. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
Trading Center