Shark Watcher


DEFINITION of 'Shark Watcher'

A firm specializing in the early detection of takeovers. The firm's primary business is usually the solicitation of proxies for client corporations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Shark Watcher'

A shark watcher monitors trading patterns in a client's stock and attempts to determine who is accumulating shares.

  1. Lobster Trap

    A strategy used by a target firm to prevent a hostile takeover. ...
  2. People Pill

    A defensive strategy to ward off a hostile takeover. The target ...
  3. Macaroni Defense

    An approach taken by a company that does not want to be taken ...
  4. Pac-Man

    A high-risk hostile takeover defense in which the target firm ...
  5. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
  6. Poison Pill

    A strategy used by corporations to discourage hostile takeovers. ...
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  1. When is a takeover bid legally canceled?

    When a firm makes an official bid to take over a target company, a legal offer is created. The firm making the offer becomes ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a merger and a takeover?

    In a general sense, mergers and takeovers (or acquisitions) are very similar corporate actions - they combine two previously ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens to the shares of stock purchased in a tender offer?

    The shares of stock purchased in a tender offer become the property of the purchaser. From that point forward, the purchaser, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some common accretive transactions?

    The term "accretive" is most often used in reference to mergers and acquisitions (M&A). It refers to a transaction that ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are companies with high Book Value Of Equity Per Share (BVPS) takeover targets?

    Companies with high book value of equity per share (BVPS) can be good takeover targets if those companies are public and ... Read Full Answer >>

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