Shark Watcher

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DEFINITION of 'Shark Watcher'

A firm specializing in the early detection of takeovers. The firm's primary business is usually the solicitation of proxies for client corporations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shark Watcher'

A shark watcher monitors trading patterns in a client's stock and attempts to determine who is accumulating shares.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Lobster Trap

    A strategy used by a target firm to prevent a hostile takeover. ...
  2. People Pill

    A defensive strategy to ward off a hostile takeover. The target ...
  3. Macaroni Defense

    An approach taken by a company that does not want to be taken ...
  4. Pac-Man

    A high-risk hostile takeover defense in which the target firm ...
  5. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
  6. Poison Pill

    A strategy used by corporations to discourage hostile takeovers. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. When is a takeover bid legally canceled?

    When a firm makes an official bid to take over a target company, a legal offer is created. The firm making the offer becomes ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a merger and a takeover?

    In a general sense, mergers and takeovers (or acquisitions) are very similar corporate actions - they combine two previously ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are corporate poison pills regulated in the United States?

    The Delaware Supreme Court was the first legal authority to declare poison pills a valid initiative. This defense is either ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can a company resist a hostile takeover?

    Several different defense strategies can be applied by existing corporate boards to ward off a hostile takeover. The most ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does a letter of intent work in the context of mergers and acquisitions?

    A letter of intent, or LOI, is used to set forth the terms of a proposed merger or acquisition. It is usually the first step ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens to the shares of a company that has been the object of a hostile takeover?

    The shares of a company that is the object of a hostile takeover rise. When a group of investors believe management is not ... Read Full Answer >>
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