Shelf Offering

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DEFINITION of 'Shelf Offering'

A Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) provision that allows an issuer to register a new issue security without selling the entire issue at once.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Shelf Offering'

The issuer can sell portions of the issue over a two-year period without re-registering the security or incurring penalties.

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