Shell Branch


DEFINITION of 'Shell Branch'

A branch location of a U.S. chartered bank located outside the United States. Shell branches function as booking offices for the bank's financial transactions that happen outside the country. The ledgers of these banks are usually kept at the bank's domestic headquarters or main office. Shell branches are frequently housed inside offshore banking centers.

BREAKING DOWN 'Shell Branch'

Shell branches provide relatively cheap access to the Eurocurrency markets. Many of these branches are located in the Bahamas and Cayman Islands. They are somewhat similar to international banking facilities, which are domestic shell branches of U.S. banks.

  1. Branch Accounting

    An accounting system in which separate accounts are maintained ...
  2. Mini-Branch

    A special type of bank branch that offers only limited products ...
  3. Branch Banking

    Engaging in banking activities such as accepting deposits or ...
  4. Eurocurrency

    Currency deposited by national governments or corporations in ...
  5. International Banking Facility ...

    A facility that allows depository institutions in the United ...
  6. Chartered Bank

    A financial institution whose primary roles are to accept and ...
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