Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR

DEFINITION of 'Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR'

The interest rate at which banks located in Asian time zones can borrow funds from other banks located in the region. In Asia, the SIBOR is used more commonly than the LIBOR. It is set daily by the Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS). More than anything else, the SIBOR serves as a benchmark, or reference rate for borrowers and lenders that are directly or indirectly involved in an Asian financial market.

BREAKING DOWN 'Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR'

Because of its location, political stability, strict legal and regulatory environment as well as the volume of business undertaken in Singapore, the city state is regarded as a major hub of Asian finance. Commonly, very large loans to businesses in the area and interest rate swaps involving businesses participating in the Asian economy will be quoted or denominated in SIBOR plus a number of basis points.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Swap

    A derivative contract through which two parties exchange financial ...
  2. LIBOR

    LIBOR or ICE LIBOR (previously BBA LIBOR) is a benchmark rate ...
  3. Australian Financial Markets Association ...

    The bank bill interest rate is the wholesale interbank rate within ...
  4. Association of Southeast Asian ...

    An organization of countries in southeast Asia set up to promote ...
  5. Asia Ex-Japan

    The region of countries located in Southeast Asia, not including ...
  6. Euro LIBOR

    London Interbank Offer Rate denominated in euros. This is the ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Dragons, Samurai Warriors And Sushi On Wall Street

    From samurai to sushi, there's no denying the East Asian influence on investing terminology.
  2. Stock Analysis

    3 Risks Emerging Markets Debt Faces in 2016

    Learn about the major risks for emerging market debt in 2016. Discover how low interest rate policies by central banks fueled the growth of debt globally.
  3. Investing News

    How Interest Rates Can Go Negative

    Central banks from Europe to Japan have implemented a negative interest rate policy (NIRP) in order to stimulate economic growth.
  4. Credit & Loans

    The 5 Things You Never Knew About Auto Loan Rates

    Buying a new car is an important decision, and if you're a savvy auto buyer, you know that getting a good deal involves more than snagging a great price.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Top 5 Large Cap Core ETFs for 2016 (VUG, SPLV)

    Look out for these five ETFs in 2016, and learn why investors should closely watch how the Federal Reserve moves heading into the new year.
  6. Economics

    The Delicate Dance of Inflation and GDP

    Investors must understand inflation and gross domestic product, or GDP, well enough to make decisions without becoming buried in data.
  7. Economics

    Industries That Thrive On Recession

    Recessions are not equally hard on everyone. In fact, there are some industries that even flourish amid the adversity.
  8. Economics

    Negative Interest Rate Policy (NIRP)

    A negative interest rate policy is an unconventional monetary policy tool in which nominal target interest rates are set below zero.
  9. Investing News

    Tufts Economists: TPP Will Reduce U.S. GDP

    According to economists at Tufts University, the TPP agreement will destroy half a million jobs in the U.S. by 2025.
  10. Forex

    The Consumer Price Index

    Find out how this economic measure can help you make key financial decisions.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a derivative?

    A derivative is a contract between two or more parties whose value is based on an agreed-upon underlying financial asset, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is comparative advantage?

    Comparative advantage is an economic law that demonstrates the ways in which protectionism (mercantilism, at the time it ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the Wall Street Journal prime rate forecast work?

    The prime rate forecast is also known as the consensus prime rate, or the average prime rate defined by the Wall Street Journal ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What's the difference between microeconomics and macroeconomics?

    Microeconomics is generally the study of individuals and business decisions, macroeconomics looks at higher up country and ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Are secured personal loans better than unsecured loans?

    Secured loans are better for the borrower than unsecured loans because the loan terms are more agreeable. Often, the interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  2. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  3. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  4. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  5. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
Trading Center