Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR

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DEFINITION of 'Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR'

The interest rate at which banks located in Asian time zones can borrow funds from other banks located in the region. In Asia, the SIBOR is used more commonly than the LIBOR. It is set daily by the Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS). More than anything else, the SIBOR serves as a benchmark, or reference rate for borrowers and lenders that are directly or indirectly involved in an Asian financial market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Singapore Interbank Offered Rate - SIBOR'

Because of its location, political stability, strict legal and regulatory environment as well as the volume of business undertaken in Singapore, the city state is regarded as a major hub of Asian finance. Commonly, very large loans to businesses in the area and interest rate swaps involving businesses participating in the Asian economy will be quoted or denominated in SIBOR plus a number of basis points.

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