Sight Letter Of Credit

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Sight Letter Of Credit'

A letter of credit that is payable once it is presented along with the necessary documents. An organization offering a sight letter of credit commits itself to paying the agreed amount of funds provided the provisions of the letter of credit are met.

BREAKING DOWN 'Sight Letter Of Credit'

For example, a business owner may present a bill of exchange to a lender along with a sight letter of credit, and walk away with the necessary funds right then. A sight letter of credit is thus more "on demand" than some other types of letters of credit.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Transferable Letter Of Credit

    A letter of credit that permits the beneficiary of the letter ...
  2. Red Clause Letter Of Credit

    A specific type of letter of credit in which a buyer extends ...
  3. Trade Finance

    The financing of international trade. Trade finance includes ...
  4. Letter Of Credit

    A letter from a bank guaranteeing that a buyer's payment to a ...
  5. Irrevocable Letter Of Credit - ...

    Correspondence issued by a bank guaranteeing payment for goods ...
  6. Standby Letter of Credit - SLOC

    A guarantee of payment issued by a bank on behalf of a client ...
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    The Evolution Of Banking

    Banks are a part of ancient history. Find out how this system of money management developed into what we know today.
  2. Personal Finance

    Using Economic Capital To Determine Risk

    Discover how banks and financial institutions use economic capital to enhance risk management.
  3. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  4. Options & Futures

    How To Establish A Credit History

    Can't get a credit card without a credit history, and can't get a history without a card? Break the Catch-22.
  5. Investing News

    Fund Firm Jolts: Pimco's Isn't The First Or Worst

    When you business is built on prudence and trust, a lot can go wrong to cost you tons of clients and assets. Here are a few examples.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares JPMorgan USD Emerg Markets Bond

    Learn about the iShares JPMorgan USD Emerging Markets Bond fund, which invests in bonds of sovereign and quasi-sovereign entities from emerging markets.
  7. Investing Basics

    What's a Treasury Note?

    A treasury note is a U.S. government debt security that offers a fixed interest rate and a maturity date that ranges between one and 10 years.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Switching Costs

    Consumers incur switching costs when they receive a monetary or other type of penalty for changing a supplier, brand or product.
  9. Investing

    Five Things to Consider Now for Your 401(k)

    If you can’t stand still, when it comes to checking your 401 (k) balance, focus on these 5 steps to help channel your worries in a more productive manner.
  10. Investing Basics

    What's a Price-Taker?

    Price-taker is an economic term describing a market participant who has no effect on overall market activity.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between a bank guarantee and a letter of credit?

    A bank guarantee and a letter of credit are similar in many ways but they're two different things. Letters of credit ensure ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    The maximum Social Security disability benefit amount for a single eligible person in 2015 is $1,165 per month, but you can ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who or what is backing municipal bonds?

    Municipal bonds are backed by dedicated taxes or revenue sources related to specific projects, or by the full faith and credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the differences between debt and equity markets?

    The basic differences between the debt and equity markets include the type of financial interest they represent, the way ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  2. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  3. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  4. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  5. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  6. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!