Silver

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DEFINITION of 'Silver'

An element commonly used in jewelry, coins, electronics and photography. Silver has the highest electrical conductivity of any metal and, thus, is seen as a highly valuable substance. In many global cultures and religions silver is used in traditional ceremonies and worn as jewelery during important occasions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Silver'

Silver, along with gold and other metals, is considered to be a precious metal. While the majority of press is given to price movements of gold in the global marketplace, silver is also viewed by many to hold key importance in understanding the potential movements of not only the commodities markets, but the overall marketplace as well. This is due to the fact that many traders trade silver based on global-macro trends.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What other options does an investor have to buying physical silver?

    A wide variety of investment options are available to traders wishing to invest in the silver market. Buying physical silver ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How are commodity spot prices different than futures prices?

    Commodity spot prices and futures prices are different quotes for different types of contracts. The spot price is the current ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do commodity spot prices indicate future price movements?

    Commodity spot prices indicate future price movements because commodity futures prices are calculated using spot prices. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Where did market to market (MTM) accounting come from?

    Mark to market accounting has been around in concept since the stock market began; however, it was not officially part of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why is market to market (MTM) accounting considered controversial?

    Mark to market accounting has been an integral component of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between economic value and market value?

    The difference between market value and economic value is that the former represents the minimum amount the customer is willing ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    A Silver Primer

    Find out what affects the price of silver, the types of investments that can be made and the methods in which it is traded.
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    A Beginner's Guide To Precious Metals

    All that glitters isn't gold. Find out how to get started on your treasure hunt.
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    Options On Gold And Silver ETFs

    Trading the commodities can mean extra expenses. These commodity-based ETFs give you the flexibility of trading like stocks.
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    If you are a hedger or a speculator, gold and silver futures contracts offer a world of profit-making opportunities.
  5. Options & Futures

    Silver Thursday: How Two Wealthy Traders Cornered The Market

    Find out how the largest speculative attempt to corner the market went awry.
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    Trading The Gold-Silver Ratio

    This method may seem arcane, but many well-established strategies rely on it.
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    3 Ways To Trade The Bounce In Coal

    News from the Supreme Court has caused active traders to turn their attention to the coal markets. We'll take a look at how to trade the bounce.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Does Spot Price Mean?

    Spot price is the current price at which a security may be bought or sold.
  9. Investing Basics

    What Does a Clearing House Do?

    A clearing house is a third-party agency or separate entity that acts as a go-between for buyers and sellers in financial markets.
  10. Investing Basics

    What is Meant by Implied Volatility?

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