Simple Random Sample

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What is a 'Simple Random Sample'

A simple random sample is a subset of a statistical population in which each member of the subset has an equal probability of being chosen. An example of a simple random sample would be the names of 25 employees being chosen out of a hat from a company of 250 employees. In this case, the population is all 250 employees, and the sample is random because each employee has an equal chance of being chosen.

BREAKING DOWN 'Simple Random Sample'

Researchers can create a simple random sample using a couple of methods. With a lottery method, each member of the population is assigned a number, after which numbers are selected at random. The example in which the names of 25 employees out of 250 are chosen out of a hat is an example of the lottery method at work. Each of the 250 employees would be assigned a number between 1 and 250, after which 25 of those numbers would be chosen at random.

For larger populations, a manual lottery method can be quite onerous. Selecting a random sample from a large population usually requires a computer-generated process, by which the same methodology as the lottery method is used, only the number assignments and subsequent selections are performed by computers, not humans.

Simple Random Sample Advantages

Ease of use represents the biggest advantage of simple random sampling. Unlike more complicated sampling methods such as stratified random sampling and probability sampling, no need exists to divide the population into subpopulations or take any other additional steps before selecting members of the population at random.

A simple random sample is meant to be an unbiased representation of a group. It is considered a fair way to select a sample from a larger population, since every member of the population has an equal chance of getting selected.

Simple Random Sample Disadvantages

A sampling error can occur with a simple random sample if the sample does not end up accurately reflecting the population it is supposed to represent. For example, in our simple random sample of 25 employees, it would be possible to draw 25 men even if the population consisted of 125 women and 125 men. For this reason, simple random sampling is more commonly used when the researcher knows little about the population. If the researcher knew more, it would be better to use a different sampling technique, such as stratified random sampling, which helps to account for the differences within the population, such as age, race or gender.

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