Simple Random Sample


DEFINITION of 'Simple Random Sample'

A subset of a statistical population in which each member of the subset has an equal probability of being chosen. A simple random sample is meant to be an unbiased representation of a group. An example of a simple random sample would be a group of 25 employees chosen out of a hat from a company of 250 employees. In this case, the population is all 250 employees, and the sample is random because each employee has an equal chance of being chosen.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Simple Random Sample'

A sampling error can occur with a simple random sample if the sample doesn't end up accurately reflecting the population it is supposed to represent. For example, in our simple random sample of 25 employees, it would be possible to draw 25 men even if the population consisted of 125 women and 125 men. For this reason, simple random sampling is more commonly used when the researcher knows little about the population. If the researcher knew more, it would be better to use a different sampling technique, such as stratified random sampling, which helps to account for the differences within the population (such as age, race or gender).

  1. Population

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  2. Z-Test

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  3. Statistical Significance

    A result that is not likely to occur randomly, but rather is ...
  4. Sampling Distribution

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  5. Probability Distribution

    A statistical function that describes all the possible values ...
  6. Non-Sampling Error

    A statistical error caused by human error to which a specific ...
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  1. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. When is it better to use systematic over simple random sampling?

    Under simple random sampling, a sample of items is chosen randomly from a population, and each item has an equal probability ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does stratified random sampling influence government policy decisions?

    Governments use various analytical techniques to examine the potential costs and benefits of policy options. One of those ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the criteria for a simple random sample?

    Simple random sampling is the most basic form of sampling and can be a component of more precise, more complex sampling methods. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do researchers ensure that a simple random sample is an accurate representation ...

    Researchers employ several safeguards to ensure that a simple random sample accurately represents a larger population. They ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the best selection methods for creating a simple random sample?

    The best selection methods for selecting a simple random sample are the lottery method, using a random number table or having ... Read Full Answer >>
  7. What are the advantages of using a simple random sample to study a larger population?

    Simple random sampling is a method used to cull a smaller sample size from a larger population and use it to research and ... Read Full Answer >>
  8. What's the difference between a representative sample and an unbiased sample?

    A representative sample is a group that is chosen to depict or represent a larger population according to one or more characteristics ... Read Full Answer >>
  9. What are the disadvantages of using a simple random sample to approximate a larger ...

    Simple random sampling statistically measures a subset of individuals selected from a larger group or population to approximate ... Read Full Answer >>
  10. What is the difference between a simple random sample and a stratified random sample?

    Simple random samples and stratified random samples differ in how the sample is drawn from the overall population of data. ... Read Full Answer >>
  11. What are the advantages and disadvantages of stratified random sampling?

    Researchers use stratified random sampling to obtain a sample population that best represents the entire population being ... Read Full Answer >>
  12. What are some examples of stratified random sampling?

    Simple random sampling is a sample of individuals that exist in a population; the individuals are randomly selected from ... Read Full Answer >>

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