Singapore Exchange - SGX

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DEFINITION of 'Singapore Exchange - SGX'

Asia-Pacific's first publicly traded exchange that was inaugurated on December 1, 1999. The SGX is the marketplace for many of Singapore's leading companies and is one of the primary markets for equities and various derivatives in south-east Asia.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Singapore Exchange - SGX'

The SGX was created through the merger of the Stock Exchange of Singapore and the Singapore International Monetary Exchanges. SGX is listed on its own exchange and is a key component of several major benchmark indexes.

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