Single Interest Insurance

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DEFINITION of 'Single Interest Insurance'

Insurance policy for lenders or lessors to protect their security interest in stated property (e.g. cars) in the event of customer default. Financing companies sometimes require single interest insurance for subprime borrowers – people with marginal credit. In most states lenders are permitted to pass on the policy cost to the borrower/customer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Single Interest Insurance'

Single interest insurance for automobiles can include various kinds of protection for the seller/financing company or leasing company:
• skip coverage protection – for when a buyer/lessee fails to make ("skips out on") payment
• theft protection
• non-filing protection – for when a lien was not recorded on the title of a vehicle
• protection from physical damage to a repossessed vehicle

RELATED TERMS
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