Single Stock Future - SSF

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DEFINITION of 'Single Stock Future - SSF'

A futures contract with an underlying of one particular stock, usually in batches of 100. No transmission of share rights or dividends occur.

BREAKING DOWN 'Single Stock Future - SSF'

Behaving exactly like a futures contract, an SSFs give investors increased capabilities to leverage themselves within the market. Additionally, these products, unlike most options, can be traded on margin.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a margin account?

    A margin account is an account offered by brokerages that allows investors to borrow money to buy securities. An investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>

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