Sinking Fund Method

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Sinking Fund Method'

A technique for depreciating an asset in bookkeeping records while also generating money to purchase a replacement for the asset when it reaches the end of its useful life. Under the sinking fund method, the business sets aside an amount of money to invest annually so that the principal plus the interest earned in the fund will be enough to replace the asset.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sinking Fund Method'

The amount of money that needs to be added to the asset-replacement fund each year is calculated by determining how much it will cost to replace the asset, how many years the asset is expected to last and what rate of interest can be earned as well as how much can be earned through the effects of compound interest. The sinking fund method is not common, and is not desirable when interest rates cannot reasonably be predicted.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Unit of Production Method

    A depreciation procedure used for property that is not in continuous ...
  2. Sum-Of-The-Years' Digits

    An accelerated method for calculating an asset's depreciation. ...
  3. Economic Depreciation

    A measure of the decrease in value of an asset over a specific ...
  4. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax ...
  5. Depreciation Recapture

    The gain received from the sale of depreciable capital property ...
  6. Salvage Value

    The estimated value that an asset will realize upon its sale ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the disadvantages of using the sinking fund method to depreciate an asset?

    Using the sinking fund depreciation definitely impinges on a company's cash flow and profitability during the depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you calculate shareholder equity?

    Shareholders' equity is listed on a company's balance sheet and measures its net worth. A company's shareholders' equity ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between earnings and profit?

    Earnings, specifically retained earnings, and profit are often used as synonyms in corporate finance, although they are different ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    An Introduction To Depreciation

    Companies make choices and assumptions in calculating depreciation, and you need to know how these affect the bottom line.
  2. Forex Education

    Depreciation: Straight-Line Vs. Double-Declining Methods

    Appreciate the different methods used to describe how book value is "used up".
  3. Economics

    Calculating Net Realizable Value

    An asset’s net realizable value is the amount a company should expect to receive once it sells or disposes of that asset, minus costs from its disposal.
  4. Professionals

    Is a Bond Market Selloff Coming?

    A big investment management company is concerned about bond market conditions and allocating more capital to cash. Should you follow?
  5. Investing Basics

    Calculating Unlevered Free Cash Flow

    Unlevered free cash flow (UFCF) is the free cash flow of a business before interest payments.
  6. Taxes

    Understanding Write-Offs

    Write-off has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used, but generally refers to a reduction in value due to expense or loss.
  7. Economics

    What are Capital Goods?

    Capital goods are assets with a useful life of more than one year that are used for the production of income.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Capital Assets

    A capital asset is one that a company plans on owning for more than one year, and uses in the production of revenue.
  9. Investing Basics

    Do You Know These Odd Investing & Business Terms?

    Think investment talk is boring? There are plenty of terms to liven up any conversation about Wall Street and finance. You should try some of them out.
  10. Professionals

    Fund Boards: What They Do and Why You Should Care

    Fund boards oversee management and operations of the fund on behalf of shareholders. Make sure you've got a board that will look out for you.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!