Sinking Fund Method

DEFINITION of 'Sinking Fund Method'

A technique for depreciating an asset in bookkeeping records while also generating money to purchase a replacement for the asset when it reaches the end of its useful life. Under the sinking fund method, the business sets aside an amount of money to invest annually so that the principal plus the interest earned in the fund will be enough to replace the asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Sinking Fund Method'

The amount of money that needs to be added to the asset-replacement fund each year is calculated by determining how much it will cost to replace the asset, how many years the asset is expected to last and what rate of interest can be earned as well as how much can be earned through the effects of compound interest. The sinking fund method is not common, and is not desirable when interest rates cannot reasonably be predicted.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the disadvantages of using the sinking fund method to depreciate an asset?

    Using the sinking fund depreciation definitely impinges on a company's cash flow and profitability during the depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
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    While the specific dormancy and escheatment rules for stock accounts vary by state, all states provide for the escheatment ... Read Full Answer >>
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