Slow Loan

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DEFINITION of 'Slow Loan'

A loan that a lender considers at risk for nonpayment. Banks and lending institutions will often set aside a portion of their cash reserves to hedge against potential slow-loan losses. The Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) originally provided a regulatory definition of a slow loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Slow Loan'

Outstanding delinquent loans must be reported to federal authorities and will be further processed through collection agencies. According to the OTS, delinquent loans are considered "slow" if a one-year loan is more than 60 days overdue or if a loan of up to seven years is over 90 days overdue.

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