Slow Market

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DEFINITION of 'Slow Market'

1. A market that currently exhibits low trading volumes and/or low volatility levels. The term slow market can be used to describe a market with few issues coming up for sale to investors through initial public offerings and secondary offerings in the equity markets, or through new issuance in the corporate bond market.

2. A market in which trades are not executed at the fastest possible speed. Generally, a delay of more than a few seconds during the execution of a trade is considered slow, especially on the electronic trading exchanges.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Slow Market'

1. Virtually any market will experience periods of low activity, ranging from a single day to months or longer. A slow market does not imply a rising or falling market, but it may imply a stationary or "hovering" market.

2. Regulation NMS was implemented to speed up situations in which slow markets exist by routing eligible orders to different exchanges for their immediate execution.

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