Small Corporate Offering Registration - SCOR


DEFINITION of 'Small Corporate Offering Registration - SCOR'

A form of corporate securities registration designed to reduce the paperwork requirements for small companies seeking to raise capital through the public sale of shares. The small corporate offering registration allows up to $1 million to be raised while avoiding the costs of an IPO. It is often referred to as an over-the-counter sale of securities, as the securities are not traded on an exchange. Instead, they are traded directly between brokers and dealers either online or over the phone.

In order to qualify for this type of registration, a company cannot be considered an investment company or involved in energy, and it must have a valid business plan.

BREAKING DOWN 'Small Corporate Offering Registration - SCOR'

Companies that use small corporate offering registration are still required to comply by all Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations regarding the offering and sale of securities. The SCOR Form allows companies to be exempted from some state securities laws (known as blue sky laws). Additionally, SCOR is only used by the companies themselves and is not used by other investors to sell their shares.

  1. SEC Form U-1

    An application or declaration made by a company to the Securities ...
  2. Registration

    1. The process by which a company files required documents with ...
  3. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  4. North American Securities Administrators ...

    A voluntary organization, established in 1919, of securities ...
  5. Blue Sky Laws

    State regulations designed to protect investors against securities ...
  6. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
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