Security Market Line - SML

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Security Market Line - SML'

A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky marketable securities.

Also refered to as the "characteristic line".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Security Market Line - SML'

The SML essentially graphs the results from the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) formula. The x-axis represents the risk (beta), and the y-axis represents the expected return. The market risk premium is determined from the slope of the SML.

The security market line is a useful tool in determining whether an asset being considered for a portfolio offers a reasonable expected return for risk. Individual securities are plotted on the SML graph. If the security's risk versus expected return is plotted above the SML, it is undervalued because the investor can expect a greater return for the inherent risk. A security plotted below the SML is overvalued because the investor would be accepting less return for the amount of risk assumed.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Systematic Risk

    The risk inherent to the entire market or entire market segment. ...
  2. Efficient Frontier

    A set of optimal portfolios that offers the highest expected ...
  3. Capital Asset Pricing Model - CAPM

    A model that describes the relationship between risk and expected ...
  4. Modern Portfolio Theory - MPT

    A theory on how risk-averse investors can construct portfolios ...
  5. Capital Market Line - CML

    A line used in the capital asset pricing model to illustrate ...
  6. Beta

    A measure of the volatility, or systematic risk, of a security ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Achieving Better Returns In Your Portfolio

    We look at three risk factors that best explain the bulk of equity performance.
  2. Investing Basics

    Beta: Know The Risk

    Beta says something about price risk, but how much does it say about fundamental risk factors? Find out here.
  3. Investing Basics

    Achieving Optimal Asset Allocation

    Minimizing risk while maximizing return is any investor's prime goal. The right mix of securities is the key to achieving your optimal asset allocation.
  4. Economics

    Understanding Perpetuity

    Perpetuity means without end. In finance, a perpetuity is a flow of money that will be received on a regular basis without a specified ending date.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a Null Hypothesis?

    In statistics, a null hypothesis is assumed true until proven otherwise.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the Capital Adequacy Ratio

    The capital adequacy ratio (CAR) is an international standard that measures a bank’s risk of insolvency from excessive losses. Currently, the minimum acceptable ratio is 8%. Maintaining an acceptable ...
  7. Investing

    Additional Paid-In Capital

    Additional paid-in capital is an account in the equity section of a balance sheet. It represents the additional amount paid for the company’s shares over the par value of the shares. Additional ...
  8. Investing

    The Capital Asset Pricing (CAPM) Model: Pros and Cons

    CAPM, while criticized for its unrealistic assumptions, provides a more useful outcome than either the DDM or WACC in many situations.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Capital Budgeting

    Capital budgeting is a planning process used by companies to evaluate which large projects to invest in, and how to finance them. It is sometimes called “investment appraisal.”
  10. Investing

    How to Use Stratified Random Sampling

    Stratified random sampling is a technique best used with a sample population easily broken into distinct subgroups. Samples are then taken from each subgroup based on the ratio of the subgroup’s ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  2. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  3. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  4. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
  5. Accrued Interest

    1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, ...
  6. Absorption Costing

    A managerial accounting cost method of expensing all costs associated with manufacturing a particular product. Absorption ...
Trading Center