Social Welfare System

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DEFINITION of 'Social Welfare System '

A social welfare system is a program that provides assistance to needy individuals and families. The types and amount of welfare available to individuals and families vary for country, state or region. In the United States, the federal government provides grants to each state through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Social Welfare System '

Welfare provides assistance to individuals and families through programs such as health care, food stamps, unemployment compensation, housing assistance and child care assistance. In the United States, a case worker is assigned to each individual or family applying for benefits to determine and confirm the applicant's needs.

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