Soft Paper Report

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DEFINITION of 'Soft Paper Report'

A reference to a lack of confidence in a report's facts or general disrespect for a report's author. A soft paper report should have only one use – as toilet paper – which is how its name was derived.

Also known as a toilet paper report.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Soft Paper Report'

Reports are almost always subjective, as even hard facts have to be interpreted. In business, it is important not to rely on everything you hear and read, and instead to do a little homework yourself. Otherwise you could find yourself relying on a report that is only good for toilet paper.

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