Soft Money


DEFINITION of 'Soft Money'

1. The "one-time" funding from governments and organizations for a project or special purpose.
2. Paper currency, as opposed to gold, silver, or some other coined metal.


A good example of soft money is the campaign funding that politicians get during election years. The money received is not recurring and it is to be used explicitly for election related expenses.

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