Solvency

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Solvency'

The ability of a company to meet its long-term financial obligations. Solvency is essential to staying in business, but a company also needs liquidity to thrive. Liquidity is a company's ability to meet its short-term obligations. A company that is insolvent must enter bankruptcy; a company that lacks liquidity can also be forced to enter bankruptcy even if it is solvent.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Solvency'

Investors can use ratios to analyze a company's solvency. The interest coverage ratio divides operating income by interest expense to show a company's ability to pay the interest on its debt, with a higher result indicating a greater solvency. The debt-to-equity ratio divides a company's debt by its equity to show whether a company has taken on too much debt, with a lower result indicating a greater solvency. Solvency ratios vary by industry, so it's important to understand what constitutes a good ratio for the company in question before drawing conclusions from the ratio calculations.

VIDEO

RELATED TERMS
  1. Liquidity Crisis

    A negative financial situation characterized by a lack of cash ...
  2. Economic Capital

    The amount of capital that a firm, usually in financial services, ...
  3. Chapter 11

    Named after the U.S. bankruptcy code 11, Chapter 11 is a form ...
  4. Expense

    1. The economic costs that a business incurs through its operations ...
  5. Liquidity

    1. The degree to which an asset or security can be bought or ...
  6. Chapter 7

    A bankruptcy proceeding in which a company stops all operations ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    How To Calculate A Z-Score

    Investors need to know how to detect signs of looming bankruptcy. The Z-score can help.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  4. Entrepreneurship

    What are the differences between chapter 7 and chapter 11 bankruptcy?

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy is sometimes also called liquidation bankruptcy. Firms experiencing this form of bankruptcy are past the stage of reorganization and must sell off any un-exempt assets to ...
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    How do I use the PEG (price to earnings growth) ratio to determine whether a stock is overvalued?

    Using the PEG, or price/earnings to growth, ratio provides a better picture of a stock's valuation versus simply relying on the P/E ratio.
  6. Taxes

    What is the best method of calculating depreciation for tax reporting purposes?

    Learn the best method for calculating depreciation for tax reporting purposes according to generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Are accounts receivable used when calculating a company's debt collateral?

    Learn how accounts receivables are recorded as assets on a balance sheet; they are used when calculating a company's total debt collateral.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Work In Progress (WIP)

    Work in progress, also know as WIP, is an asset on the company balance sheet. WIP is the accumulated costs of unfinished goods that are currently in the manufacturing process.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between cost of equity and cost of capital?

    Read about some of the differences between a company's cost of equity and its cost of capital, two measures of its required returns on raised capital.
  10. Entrepreneurship

    How do ridesharing companies like Uber make money?

    Discover the services a transportation company such as Uber provides and how the premiere ridesharing company operates and makes money.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multiplier Effect

    The expansion of a country's money supply that results from banks being able to lend. The size of the multiplier effect depends ...
  2. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  3. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  4. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  5. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  6. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
Trading Center