Philadelphia Semiconductor Index - SOX

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DEFINITION of 'Philadelphia Semiconductor Index - SOX'

A price-weighted index composed of 18 U.S. semiconductor companies primarily involved in the design, distribution, manufacture, and sale of semiconductors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Philadelphia Semiconductor Index - SOX'

This is a closely watched index for "chip" stocks. Options on the SOX are among the more actively traded options contacts.

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